Assessment

The Sport Concussion Assessment Tool: a systematic review

Written by on March 27, 2017 in Assessment

Aaron M. Yengo-Kahn, BS ,1 Andrew T. Hale, BS ,1 Brian H. Zalneraitis, BS ,1 Scott L. Zuckerman, MD,1,2 Allen K. Sills, MD,1,2 and Gary S. Solomon, PhD1,2 1Vanderbilt Sports Concussion Center, and 2Department of Neurological Surgery, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee

Over the last 2 decades, sport-related concussion (SRC) has garnered significant attention. Even with increased awareness and athlete education, sideline recognition and real-time diagnosis remain crucial. The need for an objective and standardized assessment of concussion led to the eventual development of the Sport Concussion Assessment Tool (SCAT) during the Second International Conference on Concussion in Sport in 2004, which is now in its third iteration (SCAT3). In an effort to update our understanding of the most well-known sideline concussion assessment, the authors conducted a systematic review of the SCAT and the evidence supporting its use to date.

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Do Neurocognitive SCAT3 Baseline Test Scores Differ Between Footballers (Soccer) Living With and Without Disability? A Cross-Sectional Study

Written by on March 27, 2017 in Assessment

Richard Weiler, MBChB, MSc, Willem van Mechelen, MD, PhD, Colin Fuller, PhD, Osman Hassan Ahmed, PhD, and Evert Verhagen, PhD

To determine if baseline Sport Concussion Assessment Tool, third Edition (SCAT3) scores differ between athletes with and without disability.

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Reliability and Validity of the Sport Concussion Assessment Tool-3 (SCAT3) in High School and Collegiate Athletes

Written by on March 27, 2017 in Assessment

Esther Y. Chin, Lindsay D. Nelson, William B. Barr, Paul McCrory and Michael A. McCrea

The Sport Concussion Assessment Tool–3 (SCAT3) facilitates sideline clinical assessments of concussed athletes. Yet, there is little published research on clinically relevant metrics for the SCAT3 as a whole.

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The Child Sport Concussion Assessment Tool fifth edition (Child SCAT5).

Written by on March 27, 2017 in Assessment

Gavin A Davis,1,2 Laura Purcell,3 Kathryn J Schneider,4,5,6 Keith Yeates,7 Gerry Gioia,8,9 Vicki Anderson,1 Richard G Ellenbogen,10 Ruben J Echemendia,11 Michael Makdissi,2,12 Allen Sills,13 Grant L Iverson,14 Jiri Dvorak,15 Paul McCrory,2 Willem Meeuwisse,16, Jon Patricios17,18

This article presents the Child Sport Concussion Assessment Tool fifth edition (Child SCAT5). The Sport Concussion Assessment Tool was introduced in 2004, following the Second International Conference on Concussion in Sport in Prague, Czech Republic.

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Identifying concussion: when guidelines collide with real-world implementation—is a formal medical diagnosis necessary in every case once a proper protocol is implemented?

Written by on March 27, 2017 in Assessment

Pierre Frémont

Several countries, such as Canada, are in the process of defining strategies to address the public health problem of sport-related concussions. One of the challenges is to develop strategies that can apply at the earlier levels where the timely availability of qualified healthcare resources is limited.

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Post-exertion neurocognitive test failure among student-athletes following concussion

Written by on January 19, 2016 in Assessment

Authors: NEAL MCGRATH1, WAYNE M. DINN1,2, MICHAEL W. COLLINS3, MARK R. LOVELL3, R. J. ELBIN3, & ANTHONY P. KONTOS3

The purpose of the present study was to examine post-exertion (PE) neurocognitive performance among student athletes following concussion who were asymptomatic and returned to baseline normal neurocognitive test levels at rest. This study examined the neurocognitive performance of a sub-set of student-athletes who ‘failed’ to perform at baseline levels of neurocognitive function, i.e. exhibited downward reliable change index (RCI) alterations following a moderate exertional protocol during recovery from concussion.

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Concussion in Rugby: Insights, Incidence and Intervention

Written by on January 19, 2016 in Assessment

Authors: Dr Jon Patricios

Concussion is a traumatic brain injury resulting from a direct or indirect blow to the head causing alterations in brain function. It is a complex pathophysiological process that may manifest in a number of ways reflecting physical, emotional, cognitive and sleep disturbances. Rugby Union is a collision sport with numerous phases of contact on the field resulting in the potential for collisions involving the head. The main area of play causing concussions is the tackle. Distinguishing features of rugby that impact on injury management are that it is a continuous, multiple-sprint, un-helmeted collision sport in which players are only allowed to wear limited, padded protective gear.

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Vestibular and balance issues following sportrelated concussion

Written by on January 19, 2016 in Assessment

Authors: Tamara C. Valovich McLeod & Troy D. Hale

To review relevant literature regarding the effect of concussion on vestibular function, impairments, assessments and management strategies. Dizziness and balance impairments are common following sport-related concussion. Recommendations regarding the management of sport-related concussion suggest including tests of balance within the multifactorial assessment paradigm for concussive injuries.

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Exercise Prescription Patterns in Patients Treated with Vestibular Rehabilitation After Concussion

Written by on January 19, 2016 in Assessment

Authors: Bara A. Alsalaheen1, Susan L. Whitney1,2,3, Anne Mucha2, Laura O. Morris2, Joseph M. Furman3 & Patrick J. Sparto1,2,3*

Individuals with concussion often complain of persistent dizziness and imbalance, and these problems have been treated with vestibular rehabilitation exercises. The purpose of this study is to describe the vestibular rehabilitation exercise prescriptions provided to individuals after concussion.

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Comparison and utility of King-Devick and ImPACT® composite scores in adolescent concussion patients

Written by on January 19, 2016 in Assessment

Authors: B. Joel Tjarks a,⁎, Jason C. Dorman b, Verle D. Valentine c, Thayne A.Munce b,d, Paul A. Thompsone, Shanna L. Kindt c, Michael F. Bergeronb,d,f a Sanford

To examine the diagnostic value of KD, by comparing KD with post-concussion symptom scale (PCSS) and ImPACT® composite scores.We hypothesized that KD would be correlated with visual motor speed/memory (VMS, VIS) and reaction time (RT), because all require cognitive visual processing. We also expected parallel changes in KD and PCSS across recovery.

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