Research Articles

Fifty shades of grey: concussion complexities and constructive conclusions

Written by on January 19, 2016 in Assessment

Authors: Jonathan Patricios,1,2,3 Michael Makdissi4,5

Concussion remains prominent in the medical and scientific literature but its assessment and management remain somewhat ‘grey’ and ill defined. The key issues related to concussion are widely discussed in the public arena. While these discussions should contribute to an improved understanding of concussion in the broader community, confusing messages are being driven by different agendas.

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Comprehending concussion: evolving and expanding our clinical insight

Written by on January 19, 2016 in Assessment

Authors: Michael Makdissi,1,2,3 and Jon Patricios 4,5,6

Concussion in sport has been defined as a “complex pathophysiological process affecting the brain, induced by biomechanical factors.”1 The condition is characterised by “a graded set of clinical symptoms that may or may not involve loss of consciousness.”

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World Rugby Player Welfare Myth-Busters

Written by on August 3, 2015 in World Rugby Research

Player Welfare is World Rugby’s number one priority and in a Rugby World Cup year there is significant focus, speculation and assumption regarding rugby’s approach to injury prevention and management, particularly concussion.

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World Rugby & concussion: Keeping ahead of the game, leading in sport.

Written by on August 3, 2015 in World Rugby Research

There has been a great deal of attention and debate about concussions recently, much of it emotionally charged and often not backed by evidence. The fact is, concussion is the number one priority for player welfare in rugby today.

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Player Fact Sheet: World Rugby/NZ Rugby/Auckland University of Technology RugbyHealth project

Written by on August 3, 2015 in World Rugby Research

To assess the benefits, and some areas of concern, related to longterm physical and psychological health effects of playing elite rugby (ER), community rugby (CR), and noncontact sport (NC) (i.e. cricket and hockey).

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World Rugby & New Zealand Rugby welcome long term health study outcomes

Written by on August 3, 2015 in World Rugby Research

World Rugby and New Zealand Rugby welcome the results of a wide-ranging independent study, researching the long-term physical and psychological health effects of playing elite rugby, community rugby and non-contact sports.

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King-Devick Test for Concussion

Written by on February 20, 2015 in Assessment

Authors: Various Sources, referenced within article.

Concussion, particularly in relation to sports and combat activities, is increasingly recognized as a potential cause of both short- and long-term neurologic sequelae. This review will focus on the neuro-ophthalmologic findings associated with concussion, the current tests for concussion, and the potential for visual performance measures to improve our detection and assessment of concussions.

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What are the most effective risk-reduction strategies in sport concussion?

Written by on January 19, 2015 in Assessment

Authors: Brian W Benson,1 Andrew S McIntosh,2 David Maddocks,3,4 Stanley A Herring,5 Martin Raftery,6 Jiří Dvořák7

To critically review the evidence to determine the efficacy and effectiveness of protective equipment, rule changes, neck strength and legislation in reducing sport concussion risk.

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Five years post whiplash injury: Symptoms and psychological factors in recovered versus non-recovered

Written by on January 19, 2015 in Assessment

Authros: Daniel Merrick and Britt-Marie Stålnacke*

Few studies have focused on the differences between persons who are recovered after whiplash injury and those who suffer from persistent disability. The primary aim of this study was therefore to examine differences in symptoms, psychological factors and life satisfaction between subjects classified as recovered and those with persistent disability five years after whiplash injury based on the Neck Disability Index (NDI).

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Effect of Neck Muscle Strength and Anticipatory Cervical Muscle Activation on the Kinematic Response of the Head to Impulsive Loads

Written by on January 19, 2015 in Assessment

Authors: James T. Eckner,*yz MD, Youkeun K. Oh,§ PhD, Monica S. Joshi,§ MS, James K. Richardson,y MD, and James A. Ashton-Miller,§k PhD Investigation performed at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA

Greater neck strength and activating the neck muscles to brace for impact are both thought to reduce an athlete’s risk of concussion during a collision by attenuating the head’s kinematic response after impact.

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